Thursday, January 04, 2007

The Tariqa Tijaniya and the message of Shaykh Ahmad At’Tijani Chérif

[From the French language press]:
Colloque des Frères Tijaani à Ain Mahdih: le message du Cheikh Ahmad At'Tijaani Chérif passé en revue

Le Soleil - Senegal; 29 Décembre 2006; Al Hadj Khaly Tall

A very important meeting and first international colloquium of the Tariqa Tijaniya was held in Ain Mahdih, Algeria, upon invitation of M. Abdul Aziz Boutéflikha, President of the Algerian Government.

With its 350 million [(sic), perhaps 35 or 3.5 million?] followers spread in the five Continents, the Tariqa Tijaniya is a strong force for Sufism, as well as of Sharia and Sunnah.

Tijaniya delegations from the whole world met in Ain Mahdih, in an extraordinary spirit of religious fervour.

The colloquium focused on the message of Shaykh Ahmad At’Tijani Chérif (1737-1815), born in Ain Mahdih, in the region of Lakhouat, who taught a sufism founded on peace, brotherhood, and the adherence to Islamic law.

A panel, with Tijani Sheykh M. Ibrahima Ndoye, M. Abd al Hamid Chebchoub -algerian Ambassador in Senegal, President Samba Dieng and Abdul Aziz KéBé from the University of Dakar, was broadcast on Senegal’ and Algeria’ National Televisions.

This colloquium will be held every other year, and later every year, it was decided by the algerian Ambassador.

4 comments:

irving said...

What a wonderful conference to attend :) Fortunately, the Nimatullahi Sufi Order is opening a khaniqah in Senegal soon, so inshallah, maybe it is possible in the future :)

Ya Haqq!

Irving said...

Does the Tijani Sufi Order really have 350 million followers? That is a third of all the Muslims in the world.

Ya Haqq!

Dr. Alan Godlas said...

Irving, good point about the figure 350 million.

Marina Montanaro said...

Well, i think i owe you both an explanation. I reported the figure as in the article (also) as a reminder, with the intention of checking the article with the author (quite imprecise also as it did not say WHEN this conference was held). In the mean time i stumbled into this:

"From these observations the reader might draw the conclusion that the Japanese are a quite irreligious or areligious kind of people.
Paradoxically, some statistics seem to prove the contrary. Indeed, with the exception of a few 'mission schools' religion or moral instruction based on
religion is not taught in Japanese schools; yet religion and moral concepts stemming from religious faith form an undercurrent in private and public life and as such exercise an influence on the teaching of morality. In the
light of this the following summary is revealing.

The Japanese traditional mentality of tolerance in matters of religion
complicates the problem. The paradox that by mere statistics the number of believers by far exceeds the number of the entire population has puzzled the foreign observer - that is, if you add up the figures as they are reported by the various religions themselves".

From:
Moral education in Japan
by Klaus Luhmer
Journal of Moral Education
Vol. 19 No. 3 Oct.1990
Pp.172-182

Klaus Luhmer SJ, is Professor and Chancellor, Sophia University, 7-1,
Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102, Japan.
(He is also a personal acquaintance of my mother and gave me his place at the Montessori Centenary Conference held 6-7 January 2007 in Rome, as, although he did register, at the last moment he did not feel like traveling from Japan).

So please, when it comes to religion and figures, just call me (Father)Klaus!
:D

Thursday, January 04, 2007

The Tariqa Tijaniya and the message of Shaykh Ahmad At’Tijani Chérif
[From the French language press]:
Colloque des Frères Tijaani à Ain Mahdih: le message du Cheikh Ahmad At'Tijaani Chérif passé en revue

Le Soleil - Senegal; 29 Décembre 2006; Al Hadj Khaly Tall

A very important meeting and first international colloquium of the Tariqa Tijaniya was held in Ain Mahdih, Algeria, upon invitation of M. Abdul Aziz Boutéflikha, President of the Algerian Government.

With its 350 million [(sic), perhaps 35 or 3.5 million?] followers spread in the five Continents, the Tariqa Tijaniya is a strong force for Sufism, as well as of Sharia and Sunnah.

Tijaniya delegations from the whole world met in Ain Mahdih, in an extraordinary spirit of religious fervour.

The colloquium focused on the message of Shaykh Ahmad At’Tijani Chérif (1737-1815), born in Ain Mahdih, in the region of Lakhouat, who taught a sufism founded on peace, brotherhood, and the adherence to Islamic law.

A panel, with Tijani Sheykh M. Ibrahima Ndoye, M. Abd al Hamid Chebchoub -algerian Ambassador in Senegal, President Samba Dieng and Abdul Aziz KéBé from the University of Dakar, was broadcast on Senegal’ and Algeria’ National Televisions.

This colloquium will be held every other year, and later every year, it was decided by the algerian Ambassador.

4 comments:

irving said...

What a wonderful conference to attend :) Fortunately, the Nimatullahi Sufi Order is opening a khaniqah in Senegal soon, so inshallah, maybe it is possible in the future :)

Ya Haqq!

Irving said...

Does the Tijani Sufi Order really have 350 million followers? That is a third of all the Muslims in the world.

Ya Haqq!

Dr. Alan Godlas said...

Irving, good point about the figure 350 million.

Marina Montanaro said...

Well, i think i owe you both an explanation. I reported the figure as in the article (also) as a reminder, with the intention of checking the article with the author (quite imprecise also as it did not say WHEN this conference was held). In the mean time i stumbled into this:

"From these observations the reader might draw the conclusion that the Japanese are a quite irreligious or areligious kind of people.
Paradoxically, some statistics seem to prove the contrary. Indeed, with the exception of a few 'mission schools' religion or moral instruction based on
religion is not taught in Japanese schools; yet religion and moral concepts stemming from religious faith form an undercurrent in private and public life and as such exercise an influence on the teaching of morality. In the
light of this the following summary is revealing.

The Japanese traditional mentality of tolerance in matters of religion
complicates the problem. The paradox that by mere statistics the number of believers by far exceeds the number of the entire population has puzzled the foreign observer - that is, if you add up the figures as they are reported by the various religions themselves".

From:
Moral education in Japan
by Klaus Luhmer
Journal of Moral Education
Vol. 19 No. 3 Oct.1990
Pp.172-182

Klaus Luhmer SJ, is Professor and Chancellor, Sophia University, 7-1,
Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102, Japan.
(He is also a personal acquaintance of my mother and gave me his place at the Montessori Centenary Conference held 6-7 January 2007 in Rome, as, although he did register, at the last moment he did not feel like traveling from Japan).

So please, when it comes to religion and figures, just call me (Father)Klaus!
:D