Wednesday, April 30, 2008

In the Fire of Your Love











By Emine Yildirim, "Kürşat Kızbaz’s ‘Rumi’ fit for TV rather than silver screen" - Today's Zaman - Istanbul, Turkey
Saturday, April 26, 2008

Without a doubt, the prose and philosophy of Mevlana Muhammed Jelaluddin Rumi has been influential in the lives of many.

Given that he was a 13th century spiritual figure whose legacy is still being continued by his family (the Çelebis) and his devout followers, perhaps one could go so far as to say that Rumi’s outreach is not very far from that of Buddha, Jesus, Moses and Mohammed.

If you think I’m exaggerating, I suggest that you visit the Web site of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), which declared 2007 to be the Year of Mevlana as the sage of openness, tolerance and overwhelming power of universal love.

Plus, did you know that this Muslim mystic has been the best-selling poet in the United States in recent years, with over 250,000 copies sold of his masterpiece, “Mesnevi”?

But really, why Rumi? What is so special about this Sufi dervish besides the fact that he’s the one thing that all us Turks take pride in? Take for example the verses:

“Come, come again, whoever you are, come!
Heather, fire worshipper or idolatrous, come!
Come even if you broke your penitence a hundred times.
Ours is the portal of hope, come as you are.”

Or for example:

“Oh God, let all lovers be content.
Give them happy endings.
Let their lives be celebration.
Let their hearts dance in the fire of your love.”

Of course these are just a handful of teasers in the realm of Rumi’s beliefs of self-abandonment to a higher force, ecstatic flight into the infinite and, most importantly, tolerance hand in hand with unconditional love.

As for the latest installment of films depicting the life and teachings of Rumi, novice director Kürşat Kızbaz’s 80-minute documentary, titled “Mevlana Celaleddin-i Rumi: Aşkın Dansı” (The Dance of Love), was released in theaters across Turkey this week.

An incredibly conventional film that belongs more to the small screen than the cinema, “Mevlana Celaleddin-i Rumi: Aşkın Dansı” is nevertheless a decent exercise in promoting and explaining Rumi’s beliefs through extensive interviews with his descendants, international scholars, researchers, pilgrims and devotees, supported by voiceover readings of his poems and reconstructions of Rumi’s life in the 13th century.

(...)

Rumi’s love for Shams surpassed any self-consciousness that might have brought the fear of being misunderstood.

Reading Rumi’s poetry, you always imagine the two men to have Buddha-like smiles on their faces, ready to give you a huge bear hug should you run into them.

But of course, that’s just my imagination running wild after reading verses like:

“Only from the heart can you touch the sky”

and

“You were born with wings.
Why prefer to crawl through life?”

“Mevlana Celaleddin-i Rumi: Aşkın Dansı” is not the best film portraying the brilliance of Rumi and his internationally acclaimed philosophy; however, it is admirable in its intention to promote Rumi’s ideals in the current state of Turkish affairs, where a lack of tolerance is creating a large hole that is dividing the many communities of the country.

And for those who are interested in learning more, translator Coleman Barks’ bestselling “Essential Rumi” is a good place to start.

I believe it’s appropriate to finish with another Rumi quote, one that all can take to heart:

“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right-doing, there is a field.
I will meet you there”.

1 comment:

Ruchika said...

Whenever I listen the name of 'Rumi' the first word that comes in my mind is 'Love'. Rumi's heart and poetry is over flowing with love and this love is the soul of all the religions. The path of love is beyond all the boundaries of religions and traditions. Love brings you above from all the worldly miseries and fills you with contentment, calmness, and energy. It is path for those who are ready surrender their self, their ego in the remembrance of God.
I have read Rumi's poetry at one site named www.gurumaa.com. I want to share this link with all of you.

http://www.gurumaa.com/sufi-love-poems-cds-and-books.php

Wednesday, April 30, 2008

In the Fire of Your Love










By Emine Yildirim, "Kürşat Kızbaz’s ‘Rumi’ fit for TV rather than silver screen" - Today's Zaman - Istanbul, Turkey
Saturday, April 26, 2008

Without a doubt, the prose and philosophy of Mevlana Muhammed Jelaluddin Rumi has been influential in the lives of many.

Given that he was a 13th century spiritual figure whose legacy is still being continued by his family (the Çelebis) and his devout followers, perhaps one could go so far as to say that Rumi’s outreach is not very far from that of Buddha, Jesus, Moses and Mohammed.

If you think I’m exaggerating, I suggest that you visit the Web site of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), which declared 2007 to be the Year of Mevlana as the sage of openness, tolerance and overwhelming power of universal love.

Plus, did you know that this Muslim mystic has been the best-selling poet in the United States in recent years, with over 250,000 copies sold of his masterpiece, “Mesnevi”?

But really, why Rumi? What is so special about this Sufi dervish besides the fact that he’s the one thing that all us Turks take pride in? Take for example the verses:

“Come, come again, whoever you are, come!
Heather, fire worshipper or idolatrous, come!
Come even if you broke your penitence a hundred times.
Ours is the portal of hope, come as you are.”

Or for example:

“Oh God, let all lovers be content.
Give them happy endings.
Let their lives be celebration.
Let their hearts dance in the fire of your love.”

Of course these are just a handful of teasers in the realm of Rumi’s beliefs of self-abandonment to a higher force, ecstatic flight into the infinite and, most importantly, tolerance hand in hand with unconditional love.

As for the latest installment of films depicting the life and teachings of Rumi, novice director Kürşat Kızbaz’s 80-minute documentary, titled “Mevlana Celaleddin-i Rumi: Aşkın Dansı” (The Dance of Love), was released in theaters across Turkey this week.

An incredibly conventional film that belongs more to the small screen than the cinema, “Mevlana Celaleddin-i Rumi: Aşkın Dansı” is nevertheless a decent exercise in promoting and explaining Rumi’s beliefs through extensive interviews with his descendants, international scholars, researchers, pilgrims and devotees, supported by voiceover readings of his poems and reconstructions of Rumi’s life in the 13th century.

(...)

Rumi’s love for Shams surpassed any self-consciousness that might have brought the fear of being misunderstood.

Reading Rumi’s poetry, you always imagine the two men to have Buddha-like smiles on their faces, ready to give you a huge bear hug should you run into them.

But of course, that’s just my imagination running wild after reading verses like:

“Only from the heart can you touch the sky”

and

“You were born with wings.
Why prefer to crawl through life?”

“Mevlana Celaleddin-i Rumi: Aşkın Dansı” is not the best film portraying the brilliance of Rumi and his internationally acclaimed philosophy; however, it is admirable in its intention to promote Rumi’s ideals in the current state of Turkish affairs, where a lack of tolerance is creating a large hole that is dividing the many communities of the country.

And for those who are interested in learning more, translator Coleman Barks’ bestselling “Essential Rumi” is a good place to start.

I believe it’s appropriate to finish with another Rumi quote, one that all can take to heart:

“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right-doing, there is a field.
I will meet you there”.

1 comment:

Ruchika said...

Whenever I listen the name of 'Rumi' the first word that comes in my mind is 'Love'. Rumi's heart and poetry is over flowing with love and this love is the soul of all the religions. The path of love is beyond all the boundaries of religions and traditions. Love brings you above from all the worldly miseries and fills you with contentment, calmness, and energy. It is path for those who are ready surrender their self, their ego in the remembrance of God.
I have read Rumi's poetry at one site named www.gurumaa.com. I want to share this link with all of you.

http://www.gurumaa.com/sufi-love-poems-cds-and-books.php