Sunday, June 17, 2007

To Unfold into Love

By Amy Jones - Take 5 Music/Asheville Citizen Times - NC, U.S.A.

Friday, June 15, 2007

Her parents immigrated from Iran, but singer-songwriter Haale was born in New York City and has a unique sound that mixes rock with Sufi rhythms.
Her look is exotic and her music is sometimes otherworldly, but the story of New York City- born Haale, daughter of Iranian immigrants, is uniquely American. Pronounced like the first and second syllables in hallelujah (a hard HA and a rolling leh) this singer and trance bandleader is giving thanks for two new records and a blossoming career.

She spoke with us by phone about her [coming] Wednesday night show at the Grey Eagle on Clingman Avenue.

Are the three of you mostly on the road these days or are you guys just out supporting the new discs?
Both EPs (“Morning’’ and “Paratrooper”) came out in January of this year, and we’re on our sixth tour since then. We want to support these, yeah, but we’re a band that will always be on the road at some level.

How long have you guys been working together?
The three of us, really just since January. Prior to that the drummer and I had played together for about a year. Before this I would be playing mostly NYC, and I would play with everyone; it was a real juggling act. The best musicians in New York are really busy. It’s so expensive to live there now. You have to want it. I think we’re in the zone now.

Your parents moved here from Iran. You were born in New York, and most of your immediate musical influences seem to come from psychedelic rock that you blend with Sufi rhythms and stories. The hodgepodge of it all is so American somehow. Can you tell us more?
You know it is a real American story with the immigrant parents and all, but I also have this connection to Native Americans. I have this real connection to nature. I’ve been sleeping under the stars when we camp, and we’re all playing music, beating a drum, connecting with the land. Sometimes my music gets called world music but it’s really American in that it’s part of all that cross-pollination that’s happened here. The music is very Persian as well.

Did you set out to make music from your roots?
I grew up not caring that I was Persian. Then at some point about eight years ago I was taking a class about poetry and translation. I picked a Persian author, learned to read and write the language and months later I thought it was time to sing it. I dove into this new language and music realized it is my life’s work. I wanted it to be a part of my vocabulary.

Are you talking about the Sufi influence?
Yes, Sufi mystical poetry and Sufi devotional music. Rumi is probably the most famous in this country. The message of these poets is so urgent. Everything is so rapid in our lives and their message is for each of us to unfold into love.

Your music is at times hypnotic. Are lyrics key to the trance?
I talk a lot during my show. By the end of it people get it. I will translate too, so that people get to understand more. I’m not interested in repeating a message. I don’t do dogma. I’m interested in creating art. Making something abstract enough so that people can identify with it the way they want to. I’d rather be a poet than a preacher. But within the poetry there is a strong message.

[picture: Haale. Wednesday (June 20) night at The Grey Eagle Music Hall in Asheville (NC, U.S.A.)].

2 comments:

Raza Rumi said...

I am thrilled to have discovered this blog..
Most interesting range of views and posts..
Raza
www.razarumi.com

Anonymous said...

This site is extremely interesting. My father and I contribute to a blog, where primarily I ask questions, which are Sufi related, and he provides answers and guidance. I think you will find it useful as well and I would like to possibly link our sites if agree. the site is http://spiritualsuperhighway.typepad.com/

Sunday, June 17, 2007

To Unfold into Love
By Amy Jones - Take 5 Music/Asheville Citizen Times - NC, U.S.A.

Friday, June 15, 2007

Her parents immigrated from Iran, but singer-songwriter Haale was born in New York City and has a unique sound that mixes rock with Sufi rhythms.
Her look is exotic and her music is sometimes otherworldly, but the story of New York City- born Haale, daughter of Iranian immigrants, is uniquely American. Pronounced like the first and second syllables in hallelujah (a hard HA and a rolling leh) this singer and trance bandleader is giving thanks for two new records and a blossoming career.

She spoke with us by phone about her [coming] Wednesday night show at the Grey Eagle on Clingman Avenue.

Are the three of you mostly on the road these days or are you guys just out supporting the new discs?
Both EPs (“Morning’’ and “Paratrooper”) came out in January of this year, and we’re on our sixth tour since then. We want to support these, yeah, but we’re a band that will always be on the road at some level.

How long have you guys been working together?
The three of us, really just since January. Prior to that the drummer and I had played together for about a year. Before this I would be playing mostly NYC, and I would play with everyone; it was a real juggling act. The best musicians in New York are really busy. It’s so expensive to live there now. You have to want it. I think we’re in the zone now.

Your parents moved here from Iran. You were born in New York, and most of your immediate musical influences seem to come from psychedelic rock that you blend with Sufi rhythms and stories. The hodgepodge of it all is so American somehow. Can you tell us more?
You know it is a real American story with the immigrant parents and all, but I also have this connection to Native Americans. I have this real connection to nature. I’ve been sleeping under the stars when we camp, and we’re all playing music, beating a drum, connecting with the land. Sometimes my music gets called world music but it’s really American in that it’s part of all that cross-pollination that’s happened here. The music is very Persian as well.

Did you set out to make music from your roots?
I grew up not caring that I was Persian. Then at some point about eight years ago I was taking a class about poetry and translation. I picked a Persian author, learned to read and write the language and months later I thought it was time to sing it. I dove into this new language and music realized it is my life’s work. I wanted it to be a part of my vocabulary.

Are you talking about the Sufi influence?
Yes, Sufi mystical poetry and Sufi devotional music. Rumi is probably the most famous in this country. The message of these poets is so urgent. Everything is so rapid in our lives and their message is for each of us to unfold into love.

Your music is at times hypnotic. Are lyrics key to the trance?
I talk a lot during my show. By the end of it people get it. I will translate too, so that people get to understand more. I’m not interested in repeating a message. I don’t do dogma. I’m interested in creating art. Making something abstract enough so that people can identify with it the way they want to. I’d rather be a poet than a preacher. But within the poetry there is a strong message.

[picture: Haale. Wednesday (June 20) night at The Grey Eagle Music Hall in Asheville (NC, U.S.A.)].

2 comments:

Raza Rumi said...

I am thrilled to have discovered this blog..
Most interesting range of views and posts..
Raza
www.razarumi.com

Anonymous said...

This site is extremely interesting. My father and I contribute to a blog, where primarily I ask questions, which are Sufi related, and he provides answers and guidance. I think you will find it useful as well and I would like to possibly link our sites if agree. the site is http://spiritualsuperhighway.typepad.com/