Tuesday, March 20, 2007

“It works like Sidol (stainless steel cleaner)


From the German Press
"Das wirkt wie Sidol"
Hilfssteuermann des sufistischen Glaubens: Scheich Hassan Dyck.
HNA Online
By Bastian Ludwig

Saturday 9th March, 2007
Kassel: Shaykh Hassan Dyck, the leading representative of Islamic Sufism in Germany, is coming to Kassel today. Sufis are also known as the mystics of Islam. Their history goes back to the seventh century. The Shaykh explained Sufi teachings in an interview:
What is Sufism?
Hassan Dyck: You can imagine it like a picture, the Shariah, Islamic law, is the sea and Sufism is the ship. It is the practical application of Islam whose commands to sincerity, humility, and discernment are our orientation points. The Sufi path is one of learning, experiencing, and tasting faith. Muhammed once said that the aim is to perfect the human character, this is our aspiration.
Do you taste your religion?
Dyck: If I didn’t then I would have left this path that I’ve been on for thirty years a long time ago. Belief must be experienced otherwise what is the purpose of religion? God doesn’t need our belief.
What role do you play?
Dyck: I am like a helper to the helmsman, the head of our order, Muhammad Nazim Efendi, who lives in Cypress.
How do we imagine a Sufi evening?
Dyck: I play classical cello and I bring in Oriental influences. It sounds like minimal jazz, blues, and trance. The ideas in the songs come from the Sufi tradition and I translate them into contemporary language. In my ‘Ego Song’ I sing, ‘I, I, I, want everything for me.’ It can be very funny as well. Finally we have a 1500 year old Sufi practice behind us. I lead the participants in dhikr, the remembrance of God. Motivated by the chanting in which holy words are repeated hundreds of times the dervishes begin to dance by whirling.
What is the aim in this?
Dyck: We imagine that the human soul is a mirror that reflects the divine light. The bad in the world obscures the mirror with a thick layer. Ecstatic mantra singing works like steel-cleaner. You have to scrub until the ray of light is reflected again.
Do you experience prejudice?
Dyck: I perceive Islamophobia. There isn’t enough clarification therefore we strive all the more to present the beautiful side of Islam.
Is it necessary for a guest to be familiar with Sufism?
Dyck: No, it is such a basic human story you don’t need to bring anything for that. The Sufi path has always existed, you come from God and you return to God. It doesn’t matter whether the Prophet’s name is Jesus or Muhammad; whether Jew, Christian, or Muslim, there is much in common. Religions must give up the kind of arrogance that says, ‘We’ve got the best!’

1 comment:

Irving said...

Alhamdulillah! What a beautiful interview :) Thank you fro bringing it to us :)

Ya Haqq!

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

“It works like Sidol (stainless steel cleaner)

From the German Press
"Das wirkt wie Sidol"
Hilfssteuermann des sufistischen Glaubens: Scheich Hassan Dyck.
HNA Online
By Bastian Ludwig

Saturday 9th March, 2007
Kassel: Shaykh Hassan Dyck, the leading representative of Islamic Sufism in Germany, is coming to Kassel today. Sufis are also known as the mystics of Islam. Their history goes back to the seventh century. The Shaykh explained Sufi teachings in an interview:
What is Sufism?
Hassan Dyck: You can imagine it like a picture, the Shariah, Islamic law, is the sea and Sufism is the ship. It is the practical application of Islam whose commands to sincerity, humility, and discernment are our orientation points. The Sufi path is one of learning, experiencing, and tasting faith. Muhammed once said that the aim is to perfect the human character, this is our aspiration.
Do you taste your religion?
Dyck: If I didn’t then I would have left this path that I’ve been on for thirty years a long time ago. Belief must be experienced otherwise what is the purpose of religion? God doesn’t need our belief.
What role do you play?
Dyck: I am like a helper to the helmsman, the head of our order, Muhammad Nazim Efendi, who lives in Cypress.
How do we imagine a Sufi evening?
Dyck: I play classical cello and I bring in Oriental influences. It sounds like minimal jazz, blues, and trance. The ideas in the songs come from the Sufi tradition and I translate them into contemporary language. In my ‘Ego Song’ I sing, ‘I, I, I, want everything for me.’ It can be very funny as well. Finally we have a 1500 year old Sufi practice behind us. I lead the participants in dhikr, the remembrance of God. Motivated by the chanting in which holy words are repeated hundreds of times the dervishes begin to dance by whirling.
What is the aim in this?
Dyck: We imagine that the human soul is a mirror that reflects the divine light. The bad in the world obscures the mirror with a thick layer. Ecstatic mantra singing works like steel-cleaner. You have to scrub until the ray of light is reflected again.
Do you experience prejudice?
Dyck: I perceive Islamophobia. There isn’t enough clarification therefore we strive all the more to present the beautiful side of Islam.
Is it necessary for a guest to be familiar with Sufism?
Dyck: No, it is such a basic human story you don’t need to bring anything for that. The Sufi path has always existed, you come from God and you return to God. It doesn’t matter whether the Prophet’s name is Jesus or Muhammad; whether Jew, Christian, or Muslim, there is much in common. Religions must give up the kind of arrogance that says, ‘We’ve got the best!’

1 comment:

Irving said...

Alhamdulillah! What a beautiful interview :) Thank you fro bringing it to us :)

Ya Haqq!