Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Sufism, the Soul of Existence

By Emad Al-Saqqaf and Mohammad Al-Lutaifi - Yemen Times - Sana'a, Yemen
Monday, August 27, 2007


Mohammed Al-Nadhari was born in Bani Ghazi in Al-Hujariah district of Taiz governorate. He received his primary education in Aden and transferred to Zabeed for his preparatory and secondary schooling.

He obtained a bachelor’s degree from the Islamic University of Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah and a master’s degree from Umm Al-Qura University in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 1986. He also obtained his Ph.D in Um Darman University in 1990.

Al-Nadhari is married and the father of three boys and two girls. His studies and travels ultimately landed him in the United Arab Eremites, where he currently serves as senior mufti of the Supreme Committee of Ifta.

He defended Sufism, considering it the soul of existence; an attribute he claimed protects it from corruption that pervades political parties. He made courageous statements on casual marriage – known as “tourist marriage” commonly done by rich tourists – and divorcing via SMS.

He also deplored the current situation of Yemeni women in villages. He considered the issue of Hijab, and female circumcision.

Disputes often take place in the Islamic world when deciding the first day of Ramadan. How can this be solved?
The disputes take place because in many Muslim countries the scholars refer to texts of Hadieth – prophet’s teachings – where two respectable adults must concur to have seen the moon and hence declare the beginning of the month.

There is no point these days is maintaining this method because more accurate ways of detecting the moon have been invented. Scholars must make use of modern technology such as telescopes to solve such disputes. The moon may disappear in some places of the earth and appear in other places.

(...)

Talking about different conceptions and interpretations in Islam, don’t you think that many different sects, such as Sufism have emerged?
Let me correct your understanding, Sufism is not a sect, is a level of practicing religion. It is a spiritual attainment that comes with sacrifice and to abstain from many of the earthly attractions.

Sufism actually protects the essence of religion and the purity of Islam as a concept and belief. It cannot be compared to the other sects and religious divisions you are mentioning.

What do you say of the state’s attempts to limit the influence of Sufism?
I would like to say to anyone who wants to demean Sufism that they can’t because it comes from within the soul and not from the outside. And if they feel that they can oppress Sufis and their rituals the Sufis will only get stronger and more popular.

(...)

What is your advice to Yemeni men and women?
I advise them to always turn to Allah. If we all do not turn to Allah and pray to Him we will then have no good.

1 comment:

irving said...

A really nice interview, and his last answer is the Truth.

Ya Haqq!

Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Sufism, the Soul of Existence
By Emad Al-Saqqaf and Mohammad Al-Lutaifi - Yemen Times - Sana'a, Yemen
Monday, August 27, 2007


Mohammed Al-Nadhari was born in Bani Ghazi in Al-Hujariah district of Taiz governorate. He received his primary education in Aden and transferred to Zabeed for his preparatory and secondary schooling.

He obtained a bachelor’s degree from the Islamic University of Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah and a master’s degree from Umm Al-Qura University in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 1986. He also obtained his Ph.D in Um Darman University in 1990.

Al-Nadhari is married and the father of three boys and two girls. His studies and travels ultimately landed him in the United Arab Eremites, where he currently serves as senior mufti of the Supreme Committee of Ifta.

He defended Sufism, considering it the soul of existence; an attribute he claimed protects it from corruption that pervades political parties. He made courageous statements on casual marriage – known as “tourist marriage” commonly done by rich tourists – and divorcing via SMS.

He also deplored the current situation of Yemeni women in villages. He considered the issue of Hijab, and female circumcision.

Disputes often take place in the Islamic world when deciding the first day of Ramadan. How can this be solved?
The disputes take place because in many Muslim countries the scholars refer to texts of Hadieth – prophet’s teachings – where two respectable adults must concur to have seen the moon and hence declare the beginning of the month.

There is no point these days is maintaining this method because more accurate ways of detecting the moon have been invented. Scholars must make use of modern technology such as telescopes to solve such disputes. The moon may disappear in some places of the earth and appear in other places.

(...)

Talking about different conceptions and interpretations in Islam, don’t you think that many different sects, such as Sufism have emerged?
Let me correct your understanding, Sufism is not a sect, is a level of practicing religion. It is a spiritual attainment that comes with sacrifice and to abstain from many of the earthly attractions.

Sufism actually protects the essence of religion and the purity of Islam as a concept and belief. It cannot be compared to the other sects and religious divisions you are mentioning.

What do you say of the state’s attempts to limit the influence of Sufism?
I would like to say to anyone who wants to demean Sufism that they can’t because it comes from within the soul and not from the outside. And if they feel that they can oppress Sufis and their rituals the Sufis will only get stronger and more popular.

(...)

What is your advice to Yemeni men and women?
I advise them to always turn to Allah. If we all do not turn to Allah and pray to Him we will then have no good.

1 comment:

irving said...

A really nice interview, and his last answer is the Truth.

Ya Haqq!