Tuesday, August 14, 2007

A Testament to Eternal Love

ANI - Daily India - Jacksonville, FL, U.S.A.
Sunday, August 12, 2007

Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, who built the world-renowned monument Taj Mahal, was remembered on his 352nd death anniversary on Saturday.

Agra: Thousands of people visited the mausoleum to offer prayers. The congregation is called "Urs".

Prayers for peace and love and a 170-meter [185 yards] long multi-coloured chaddar (holy cloth) was offered on the occasion.

"We prayed for peace in the country. And, as the Taj Mahal is a symbol of love, we hope and pray that in coming times there is harmony between various religions," said Premji Lal Suman, a lawmaker.

Sufi-Din Mohammad Shah, a Sufi shaykh, said: "This is a world famous monument. Shah Jahan is the Guru (teacher) to people of all religions -- Hindu, Muslims, all."

Security was beefed up at the monument to control the huge crowd and prevent any untoward incident.

The white marble mausoleum was built by Shah Jahan as a testament to his eternal love for his wife Mumtaz Mahal, who died during childbirth. The Taj Mahal stands on a marble platform surrounded by ornamental gardens. White minarets grace each corner and two smaller red sandstone buildings balance the postcard-perfect image on the banks of the Yamuna River.

Recently, the monument was voted as one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.

A masterwork produced at the peak of the Mughal dynasty that ruled India for more than three centuries, the edifice took 22 years to be construct and needed an army of 20,000 workers drawn from as far as Europe and Central Asia.

The monument has a rich lore, including the story that the bereaved emperor who commissioned it was deposed and imprisoned by his son Aurangzeb in the Agra Fort. Shah Jahan spent his final days gazing wistfully at his creation.

[picture: The Emperor Shah Jahan standing upon a globe; mid-17th century Hashim Mughal dynasty; Color and gold on paper. H: 25.1 W: 15.8 cm (H: 9.8'' W: 6.2") India. Source: Smithsonian Institute - Freer and Sackler Gallery http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Shahjahan_on_globe.jpg]

1 comment:

irving said...

Rejoice, O Pen! If you cannot but break
when you write the word Love,
Then a thousand times will you break
at this tale.
But what sorrow is this?
Love is worth breaking for.

Ya Haqq!

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

A Testament to Eternal Love
ANI - Daily India - Jacksonville, FL, U.S.A.
Sunday, August 12, 2007

Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, who built the world-renowned monument Taj Mahal, was remembered on his 352nd death anniversary on Saturday.

Agra: Thousands of people visited the mausoleum to offer prayers. The congregation is called "Urs".

Prayers for peace and love and a 170-meter [185 yards] long multi-coloured chaddar (holy cloth) was offered on the occasion.

"We prayed for peace in the country. And, as the Taj Mahal is a symbol of love, we hope and pray that in coming times there is harmony between various religions," said Premji Lal Suman, a lawmaker.

Sufi-Din Mohammad Shah, a Sufi shaykh, said: "This is a world famous monument. Shah Jahan is the Guru (teacher) to people of all religions -- Hindu, Muslims, all."

Security was beefed up at the monument to control the huge crowd and prevent any untoward incident.

The white marble mausoleum was built by Shah Jahan as a testament to his eternal love for his wife Mumtaz Mahal, who died during childbirth. The Taj Mahal stands on a marble platform surrounded by ornamental gardens. White minarets grace each corner and two smaller red sandstone buildings balance the postcard-perfect image on the banks of the Yamuna River.

Recently, the monument was voted as one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.

A masterwork produced at the peak of the Mughal dynasty that ruled India for more than three centuries, the edifice took 22 years to be construct and needed an army of 20,000 workers drawn from as far as Europe and Central Asia.

The monument has a rich lore, including the story that the bereaved emperor who commissioned it was deposed and imprisoned by his son Aurangzeb in the Agra Fort. Shah Jahan spent his final days gazing wistfully at his creation.

[picture: The Emperor Shah Jahan standing upon a globe; mid-17th century Hashim Mughal dynasty; Color and gold on paper. H: 25.1 W: 15.8 cm (H: 9.8'' W: 6.2") India. Source: Smithsonian Institute - Freer and Sackler Gallery http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Shahjahan_on_globe.jpg]

1 comment:

irving said...

Rejoice, O Pen! If you cannot but break
when you write the word Love,
Then a thousand times will you break
at this tale.
But what sorrow is this?
Love is worth breaking for.

Ya Haqq!