Sunday, September 28, 2008

On Hakim Sanai


SB/YAW MNA,"" - Mehr News Agency - Tehran, Iran
Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Alzahra University will hold a conference on Hakim Sanai on the commemoration of his 850th birthday on December 2 and 3.

Scholars and academics will submit papers on the life, works and beliefs of the Iranian sufi Hakim Abul-Majd Majdud ibn Adam Sanai Ghaznavi.

Sanai and criticism on his works, Sanai ideology and his mysticism, the poetry style of Sanai, Sanai’s wisdom and philosophy are the themes of the conference.

Known as Sanai or Sanai of Ghazna, he was one of the earlier Sufi poets. He was born in the province of Ghazna in 1080(?) and died around 1150.

Rumi acknowledged Sanai and Attar as his two primary inspirations, saying, “Attar is the soul and Sanai its two eyes, I came after Sanai and Attar”.

His book “Hadiqatul Haqiqah” (The Walled Garden of Truth) contains mystical teachings intermingled with proverbs, fables, and anecdotes. The uncommon manner in which Sanai introduced and explained the esoteric teachings of Sufism -- through the medium of poetry -- was a key to its popularity and lasting value.

It is still widely considered by scholars to be the first great mystical poem in Dari, and the work had far reaching influence on both Muslim and Persian literature.

[For Sufi Poetry, visit the reception area of the Sufi Book Store http://sufibookstore.blogspot.com/].

1 comment:

Shara Banisadr said...

I just like to add sufi jokes for spreading joy I hope you like it.

The tales of Nasrudin are sometimes adapted and used as teaching stories by followers of the Sufi way. Iranian mystic traditions use jokes, stories and poetry to express certain teaching. I grow up with Mulah Nasrudin tales and never knew him as Sufi teacher but loved his sense of hummer. it is said, there are as many interpretations as stars in the sky. Enjoy.

Free Nasruddin ecard




Who Am I?

Mullah Nasrudin was going into a large inn to sleep for the night. There were many beds all in one room. The thought occurred to Nasrudin that in the dark he would not know who he was, so he tied a balloon to his ankle. While Nasrudin was sleeping, the man in the next bed decided to play a joke. He untied Nasrudin's balloon and tied it on his own ankle. When Nasrudin woke up, he looked at the man next to him. Then he reached out to shake hands and said, "Ah, I know who you are. You are Mullah Nasrudin, but please, tell me who I am."

Buy a Pair of Trouse

Mullah Nasruddin went into a shop to buy a pair of trousers. Then he changed his mind and chose a cloak instead, at the same price. Picking up the cloak he left the shop. "You have not paid," shouted the merchant. "I left you the trousers, which were of the same value as the cloak." "But you did not pay for the trousers either." "Of course not," said Nasruddin - "why should I pay for something that I did not want to buy?"

A High Wind

Mullah Nasrudin climbed into someone's kitchen garden and started filling a sack with everything that he could lay his hands on. A gardener saw him and came running. "What are you doing here?" "I was blown here by a high wind." "And who uprooted the vegetables?" "I caught hold of them to stop myself being swept along." "And how does it come that there are vegetables in that sack?" "That is just what I was wondering about when you interrupted me."

Hot Soup

Hearing that a man wanted to learn the Kurdish language, Mullah Nasrudin offered to teach him even though Nasrudin's own knowledge of Kurdish was limited to a few words. "We shall start with the word for 'Hot Soup'," said Nasrudin. "In Kurdish, this is Aash." "I don't quite understand, Nasrudin. How would you say 'Cold Soup'?" "You never say 'Cold Soup'. The Kurds like their soup hot."

On Forgetfulness

Mullah Nasrudin called at a castle to collect for charity. "Tell your master," he said to doorkeeper, "that Mullah Nasrudin is here and asks for money." The man went into the building, then came out again. "I am afraid that my master is out," he said. "Let me give you a message for him, then," said Nasrudin. "Even though he has not contributed he can have this advice for free. Next time he goes out he should not leave his face at the window. Someone might steal it."

A High Wind

Mullah Nasrudin climbed into someone's kitchen garden and started filling a sack with everything that he could lay his hands on. A gardener saw him and came running. "What are you doing here?" "I was blown here by a high wind." "And who uprooted the vegetables?" "I caught hold of them to stop myself being swept along." "And how does it come that there are vegetables in that sack?" "That is just what I was wondering about when you interrupted me."


Hot Soup

Hearing that a man wanted to learn the Kurdish language, Mullah Nasrudin offered to teach him even though Nasrudin's own knowledge of Kurdish was limited to a few words. "We shall start with the word for 'Hot Soup'," said Nasrudin. "In Kurdish, this is Aash." "I don't quite understand, Nasrudin. How would you say 'Cold Soup'?" "You never say 'Cold Soup'. The Kurds like their soup hot."

Lost Again

One day there was news in every corner of the town about Mullah Nasrudin's donkey, which he had lost. When his neighbors heard the news they got sad, and decided to go to the Mullah's house and help him to find his donkey. So they came to the Mullah's house and saw that the Mullah was very happy and very thankful to God! They couldn't understand it and asked the Mullah: " Mullah aren't you sad about loss of your donkey?" The Mullah laughed and said, "I am happy because God helped me that I was not riding it, otherwise I would be lost as well."


This is for Last Week

Nasrudin went to a Turkish bath. As he was poorly dressed the attendants treated him in a casual manner, game him only a scrap of soap and an old towel. When he left, Nasrudin gave the two men a gold coin each. He had not complained, and they could not understand it. Could it be, they wondered, that if he had been better treated he would have given an even larger tip? The following week Nasrudin appeared again. This time, of course, he was looked after like a king. After being massaged, perfumed and treated with the utmost deference, he left the bath, handing each attendant the smallest possible copper coin. "This," said Nasrudin, "is for last time. The gold coins were for this week."

Sunday, September 28, 2008

On Hakim Sanai

SB/YAW MNA,"" - Mehr News Agency - Tehran, Iran
Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Alzahra University will hold a conference on Hakim Sanai on the commemoration of his 850th birthday on December 2 and 3.

Scholars and academics will submit papers on the life, works and beliefs of the Iranian sufi Hakim Abul-Majd Majdud ibn Adam Sanai Ghaznavi.

Sanai and criticism on his works, Sanai ideology and his mysticism, the poetry style of Sanai, Sanai’s wisdom and philosophy are the themes of the conference.

Known as Sanai or Sanai of Ghazna, he was one of the earlier Sufi poets. He was born in the province of Ghazna in 1080(?) and died around 1150.

Rumi acknowledged Sanai and Attar as his two primary inspirations, saying, “Attar is the soul and Sanai its two eyes, I came after Sanai and Attar”.

His book “Hadiqatul Haqiqah” (The Walled Garden of Truth) contains mystical teachings intermingled with proverbs, fables, and anecdotes. The uncommon manner in which Sanai introduced and explained the esoteric teachings of Sufism -- through the medium of poetry -- was a key to its popularity and lasting value.

It is still widely considered by scholars to be the first great mystical poem in Dari, and the work had far reaching influence on both Muslim and Persian literature.

[For Sufi Poetry, visit the reception area of the Sufi Book Store http://sufibookstore.blogspot.com/].

1 comment:

Shara Banisadr said...

I just like to add sufi jokes for spreading joy I hope you like it.

The tales of Nasrudin are sometimes adapted and used as teaching stories by followers of the Sufi way. Iranian mystic traditions use jokes, stories and poetry to express certain teaching. I grow up with Mulah Nasrudin tales and never knew him as Sufi teacher but loved his sense of hummer. it is said, there are as many interpretations as stars in the sky. Enjoy.

Free Nasruddin ecard




Who Am I?

Mullah Nasrudin was going into a large inn to sleep for the night. There were many beds all in one room. The thought occurred to Nasrudin that in the dark he would not know who he was, so he tied a balloon to his ankle. While Nasrudin was sleeping, the man in the next bed decided to play a joke. He untied Nasrudin's balloon and tied it on his own ankle. When Nasrudin woke up, he looked at the man next to him. Then he reached out to shake hands and said, "Ah, I know who you are. You are Mullah Nasrudin, but please, tell me who I am."

Buy a Pair of Trouse

Mullah Nasruddin went into a shop to buy a pair of trousers. Then he changed his mind and chose a cloak instead, at the same price. Picking up the cloak he left the shop. "You have not paid," shouted the merchant. "I left you the trousers, which were of the same value as the cloak." "But you did not pay for the trousers either." "Of course not," said Nasruddin - "why should I pay for something that I did not want to buy?"

A High Wind

Mullah Nasrudin climbed into someone's kitchen garden and started filling a sack with everything that he could lay his hands on. A gardener saw him and came running. "What are you doing here?" "I was blown here by a high wind." "And who uprooted the vegetables?" "I caught hold of them to stop myself being swept along." "And how does it come that there are vegetables in that sack?" "That is just what I was wondering about when you interrupted me."

Hot Soup

Hearing that a man wanted to learn the Kurdish language, Mullah Nasrudin offered to teach him even though Nasrudin's own knowledge of Kurdish was limited to a few words. "We shall start with the word for 'Hot Soup'," said Nasrudin. "In Kurdish, this is Aash." "I don't quite understand, Nasrudin. How would you say 'Cold Soup'?" "You never say 'Cold Soup'. The Kurds like their soup hot."

On Forgetfulness

Mullah Nasrudin called at a castle to collect for charity. "Tell your master," he said to doorkeeper, "that Mullah Nasrudin is here and asks for money." The man went into the building, then came out again. "I am afraid that my master is out," he said. "Let me give you a message for him, then," said Nasrudin. "Even though he has not contributed he can have this advice for free. Next time he goes out he should not leave his face at the window. Someone might steal it."

A High Wind

Mullah Nasrudin climbed into someone's kitchen garden and started filling a sack with everything that he could lay his hands on. A gardener saw him and came running. "What are you doing here?" "I was blown here by a high wind." "And who uprooted the vegetables?" "I caught hold of them to stop myself being swept along." "And how does it come that there are vegetables in that sack?" "That is just what I was wondering about when you interrupted me."


Hot Soup

Hearing that a man wanted to learn the Kurdish language, Mullah Nasrudin offered to teach him even though Nasrudin's own knowledge of Kurdish was limited to a few words. "We shall start with the word for 'Hot Soup'," said Nasrudin. "In Kurdish, this is Aash." "I don't quite understand, Nasrudin. How would you say 'Cold Soup'?" "You never say 'Cold Soup'. The Kurds like their soup hot."

Lost Again

One day there was news in every corner of the town about Mullah Nasrudin's donkey, which he had lost. When his neighbors heard the news they got sad, and decided to go to the Mullah's house and help him to find his donkey. So they came to the Mullah's house and saw that the Mullah was very happy and very thankful to God! They couldn't understand it and asked the Mullah: " Mullah aren't you sad about loss of your donkey?" The Mullah laughed and said, "I am happy because God helped me that I was not riding it, otherwise I would be lost as well."


This is for Last Week

Nasrudin went to a Turkish bath. As he was poorly dressed the attendants treated him in a casual manner, game him only a scrap of soap and an old towel. When he left, Nasrudin gave the two men a gold coin each. He had not complained, and they could not understand it. Could it be, they wondered, that if he had been better treated he would have given an even larger tip? The following week Nasrudin appeared again. This time, of course, he was looked after like a king. After being massaged, perfumed and treated with the utmost deference, he left the bath, handing each attendant the smallest possible copper coin. "This," said Nasrudin, "is for last time. The gold coins were for this week."