Saturday, May 05, 2007

Spectacular Night Beckons Nagpurians

The Times of India - New Delhi, India
Saturday, May 5, 2007

It promises to be the wildest and most rocking Saturday night party.

Sultan of Sufi Kailash Kher and jaw-dropper Kashmera Shah will give Nagpurians a double dose of high octane entertainment on Saturday evening, 6.30 pm, at Kasturchand Park.

It will be the second big concert organised by The Times of India in Nagpur, after the immensely successful first one in November last year that featured Sonu Nigam, Raageshwari and Ehsaan Qureshi.

If you love soulful singing, Kher is truly 'Allah ka banda.' The rare moving quality in his voice probably reflects the hardships he endured -- and won over -- before becoming one of the most sought-after voices in the industry.

But even when he was young, Kher seems to have had a plan. As a boy, he ran away from his home in Meerut and landed in New Delhi, where he learned Hindustani classical music from as many as 15 different teachers.

His is a virtual raga-to-riches story -- he once lived at Andheri railway station in Mumbai.

Starting out with singing jingles, Kher slalomed to stardom with the raw yet riveting rendition 'Allah ke bande' from the movie 'Waisa Bhi Hota Hai Part-II.' Since then, whether it's 'O Sikandar' from Corporate or 'Chakde Phatte' from Khosla Ka Ghosla or 'Teri Deewani' from his album Kailasa, Kher has left an indelible mark in the hearts of millions of his fans.

If Kailash Kher is treating for the ears, stunner Kashmera Shah is sure to thrill Nagpurians with her captivating moves.

A successful model, the dusky Kashmera has also acted in several films, prominent among them being Yes Boss and Jungle. Kash, as she is often called, has also featured in drool-worthy item numbers in films such as Vaastav and Aankhen.

She is acclaimed to be one of the best dancers of this generation and is sure to get Nagpurians up on their feet during the concert.

The show promises to be a blockbuster. Are you ready?

2 comments:

irving said...

drool worthy? lol who writes this stuff?

Ya Haqq!

Marina Montanaro said...

Salaam Dear Brother Irving,
although yours is a rhethorical question, i think i can give you an answer other than the literal -which would be, of course, that when otherwise noted, it was the staff of the (daily) newspaper who wrote the article, and you can reach them by clicking on the title of the article itself.
But reality, as you may suspect, is another [:D].
There is American English, British English and International English. Also, there are a lot of Local Englishes (!). It is not much the grammar which varies, but the flavour. So it might well be that "drool-worthy" in Delhi (and in New Delhi, let alone by the Nagpurians) is an expression wich carries totally another...taste! ;D.
In my (now)decades-long dealing with the English language as a bridge to communication, i often found American English much difficult to understand (for foreigners as myself) exactly because the writers expect (and sometimes pretend)their native language to have that meaning that they have learnt and/or that applies locally, and no other. Alas, to understand and to be understood is seldom a matter of understanding...

Ya Wadud!

Saturday, May 05, 2007

Spectacular Night Beckons Nagpurians
The Times of India - New Delhi, India
Saturday, May 5, 2007

It promises to be the wildest and most rocking Saturday night party.

Sultan of Sufi Kailash Kher and jaw-dropper Kashmera Shah will give Nagpurians a double dose of high octane entertainment on Saturday evening, 6.30 pm, at Kasturchand Park.

It will be the second big concert organised by The Times of India in Nagpur, after the immensely successful first one in November last year that featured Sonu Nigam, Raageshwari and Ehsaan Qureshi.

If you love soulful singing, Kher is truly 'Allah ka banda.' The rare moving quality in his voice probably reflects the hardships he endured -- and won over -- before becoming one of the most sought-after voices in the industry.

But even when he was young, Kher seems to have had a plan. As a boy, he ran away from his home in Meerut and landed in New Delhi, where he learned Hindustani classical music from as many as 15 different teachers.

His is a virtual raga-to-riches story -- he once lived at Andheri railway station in Mumbai.

Starting out with singing jingles, Kher slalomed to stardom with the raw yet riveting rendition 'Allah ke bande' from the movie 'Waisa Bhi Hota Hai Part-II.' Since then, whether it's 'O Sikandar' from Corporate or 'Chakde Phatte' from Khosla Ka Ghosla or 'Teri Deewani' from his album Kailasa, Kher has left an indelible mark in the hearts of millions of his fans.

If Kailash Kher is treating for the ears, stunner Kashmera Shah is sure to thrill Nagpurians with her captivating moves.

A successful model, the dusky Kashmera has also acted in several films, prominent among them being Yes Boss and Jungle. Kash, as she is often called, has also featured in drool-worthy item numbers in films such as Vaastav and Aankhen.

She is acclaimed to be one of the best dancers of this generation and is sure to get Nagpurians up on their feet during the concert.

The show promises to be a blockbuster. Are you ready?

2 comments:

irving said...

drool worthy? lol who writes this stuff?

Ya Haqq!

Marina Montanaro said...

Salaam Dear Brother Irving,
although yours is a rhethorical question, i think i can give you an answer other than the literal -which would be, of course, that when otherwise noted, it was the staff of the (daily) newspaper who wrote the article, and you can reach them by clicking on the title of the article itself.
But reality, as you may suspect, is another [:D].
There is American English, British English and International English. Also, there are a lot of Local Englishes (!). It is not much the grammar which varies, but the flavour. So it might well be that "drool-worthy" in Delhi (and in New Delhi, let alone by the Nagpurians) is an expression wich carries totally another...taste! ;D.
In my (now)decades-long dealing with the English language as a bridge to communication, i often found American English much difficult to understand (for foreigners as myself) exactly because the writers expect (and sometimes pretend)their native language to have that meaning that they have learnt and/or that applies locally, and no other. Alas, to understand and to be understood is seldom a matter of understanding...

Ya Wadud!